Saturday, July 25, 2009

Internet Explorer 8 provides best web browsing experience

Well, that's what this commercial seems to tell us:

Their claims? That my slow browser is probably "several generations old." They tell me that IE8 is "a huge improvement on the speed scale."

These statements are true if I ordinarily run Mosaic. Of course, IE8 is one more generation of the same old software, and to say that IE8 is faster than IE7 is kinda like saying that Windows 7 will be faster than Vista. They'd have to try hard to make it the other way around.

Of course, they completely fail to mention that IE8 fails almost as hard as IE7 when it comes to meeting web standards. Finally, Microsoft managed to turn this:

...into this:

Congratulations, Microsoft. You finally passed the Acid2 test. But every other browser's been breezing through for quite some time now. Find something else to impress me with.

And how about Acid3? Here's the debacle we know as IE7's rendering:

And here's the major improvement shown by IE8:

Wow! Now it says, "FAIL" in giant letters just to let you know that it does, in fact, fail. It probably says that in the IE7 rendering as well, but it's difficult to tell what with all the mangled distortion of crap way up there.

This test takes about two to three seconds to run in Firefox and Chrome (with Chrome running about half a second faster). In Internet Explorer, it's about nine seconds. How's that for fast!

One generation older and seven seconds slower.

On an unrelated note, after Microsoft's failed ad campaign starring Jerry Seinfeld, you'd think that other has-been performers from the 90's would realize that perhaps Microsoft commercials are not the best way to make a career comeback.

11 comments:

  1. Yes, because Acid2/3 are totally indicators of real world use cases. Acid3 even tests stuff that aren't part of w3c standards yet. Acid3 is the webs version of the synthetic benchmark. It can reveal deficiencies, but it doesn't have much to do with real workloads.
    Congratulations on skipping the part where IE 8 can render a number of websites that bunches of people have set as their homepages faster than its competitors.
    Posted from firefox, because I still think its a better browser.

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  2. They're a goal. When a browser renders these perfectly, then the browsers are capable of even correcting bad code. IE has trouble rendering correct code.

    The point of the Acid tests is that if we're going to be depending on our browsers more in the future, they should be more robust programs. The Acid tests give us something to work toward.

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  3. And you're right. Firefox still is a better browser, all rendering issues aside. Chrome ain't half bad, either.

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  4. And for what it's worth, in my personal tests, IE8 running on Windows XP 64-bit with an AMD Phenom II C4 processor maxing at 2.8 GHz per core and 2 GB of DDR2 1200 MHz RAM behind it takes about five to ten seconds to load to about:blank. Not very fast at all, really.

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  5. Personally I dont much care how a browser renders sites. I've never had a browser that wouldnt load a page (With the exception of a few online game sites and Netflix, not working on Linux). My problem with IE7 and IE8 is the interface. Who was the drunk retarded 3 year old that came up with those idiotic button layouts? They make absolutely zero sense whatsoever.

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  6. Who was the drunk retarded 3 year old that came up with those idiotic button layouts?


    Steve Balmer

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  7. I just tested Firefox 3.0.12 on my Ubuntu Linux box on the Acid 3 page and Firefox came up with a 72% score, which is exactly 3.6 times more than what IE8 scored. Once again, Microsoft fails to cut through the bovine manure.

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  8. This ad is as terrible as their software...I think they have the wrong people on each job: IT people shouldn't make ads and clowns shouldn't make software.

    McPop.

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  9. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0idaN0MY1U&feature=related

    That is window compositing in Windows Longhorn in 2003, include wobbly windows, 3 years before Compiz.

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  10. @Anonymous - That's so cool! How can I enable this in my Windows operating system of choice? Is it something I can download? Can I buy it somewhere?

    First of all, your post is irrelevant to the content of this post. Secondly, development means nothing without public release.

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